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Ten ways to think about accessibility & inclusion

This tool will help you think about different ways to facilitate access and inclusion when you are creating financial capability programs.

About this tool

This tool is from a resource called ‘Lens on, hands on: An Intersectional Guide to Financial Capability Program Development,’ created by Good Shepherd Australia & New Zealand, WIRE and Women with Disabilities Victoria, as part of the Women’s Financial Capabilities Project. This content in this resource was led by a co-design process which engaged First Nations women, women from migrant, refugee, and asylum seeker backgrounds and women with disabilities.

 

Before you begin: 3 general rules

  • Everyone is different even if we share similarities. Get to know your target audience.
  • Asking is better than assuming. People know what they need
  • Understanding what a person needs is an ongoing conversation and starts with respect.

Ten ways to think about accessibility & inclusion

1. Attitudes and assumptions

Ask yourself

2. Communication accessibility

Ask yourself

3. Physical accessibility

Ask yourself

  • Do your participants have physical accessibility needs? Are the bathrooms accessible and gender neutral?
  • Is the lighting suitable for vision impaired people?
  • Is there a break room or resting space?
  • Is there clear information about transport and parking?

4. Digital access

Ask yourself

  • Do your participants need good internet connection?
  • Are they comfortable with online technology?
  • Who may be included or excluded if the program is digital only?
  • Are you recording online sessions? ◊ Do you need a quick exit button for web pages?

5. Cultural safety and sensitivity

Ask yourself

  • Is the space safe for people to talk about money?
  • How will you respect cultural norms that are not your own?
  • Who is facilitating? How will you make the session relatable?
  • Do you have strategies for discriminatory or disrespectful behaviour?

6. Language

Ask yourself

  • Do you know about person first or inclusive language?
  • Are you matching the spoken and body language of your participants?
  • Are you able to explain financial jargon in everyday words?

7. Time

Ask yourself

  • Are you flexible when working with co–design participants or consultants?
  • Are you giving time to read, time to speak, time to process, time to translate, time to trust and time for feedback?

8. Learning styles and topics

Ask yourself

  • Are you using adult learning principles?
  • Do you know what participants are interested in knowing more about?
  • Have you explored all learning styles?
  • How will you make it fun? Less scary? Or not boring?

9. Different life stages and circumstances

Ask yourself

10. Power imbalances

Ask yourself

  • What power differentials in the room do you have to look out for?
  • How can you take an “I am not the expert” approach?
  • How will you respect and work with the experience people have?

Learn more about the Intersectional Guide to Financial Capability Program Development

Learn more

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